How to Break in Climbing Shoes – (9 Best Tips)

If you’re just starting out climbing, one of the most important pieces of gear that you’ll need to invest in is a good pair of climbing shoes. But how do you know when they’re broken in and ready for use? No one wants to lose their pair of shoes.

Climbing shoes are notorious for being uncomfortable when you first start wearing them, but with a few simple tricks, you can break them in quickly and easily. In this blog post, we will teach you how to break in climbing shoes so that you can start crushing climbs right away!

How Tight Should Climbing Shoes Be?

When you first purchase a pair of climbing shoes, they might feel tight and uncomfortable. This is because the rubber on your new shoes hasn’t had time to stretch out yet. While your shoes must fit snugly without any gaps between your foot and shoe (especially near the toes or heel), it’s best not to wear them too tight if you want them to last longer.

Ideally, your shoes should feel snug but not too tight – you should still be able to wiggle your toes around comfortably. If the shoes are so tight that they’re causing pain or discomfort, then they’re likely too small, and you should size up.

How Long It Takes to Break In Climbing Shoes?

Climbing shoes are notorious for being uncomfortable when first worn, but with some simple tricks, they’ll be ready for action in no time. Depending on how often you use them and what kind of climbing you’re doing, it may take anywhere from one week to six months.

The best way is to break them slowly over time by wearing socks while training indoors or using a heavy book against the wall every other day until they become more comfortable when worn without socks.

Check this out: How to Make Shoes Smaller (8 Easy Methods)

9 Tips for Breaking in Climbing Shoes

In order to break into climbing shoes, there are a few tips and tricks that you can try.

1) Wear Them Every Day or Two

When you first get your new climbing shoes, it’s important to wear them often so they can begin stretching out. If you only use your new pair of climbing shoes once every week, then it’ll likely take

much longer to break them in. Try wearing them every day or two, so they can stretch out more quickly.

2) Use a Blow Dryer

If you’re in a hurry to break climbing shoes, then you can use a blow dryer. First, put them on and tighten them as much as possible. Then, using a low setting on your blow dryer, heat up the shoes for about 30 seconds – make sure not to overheat them, or they may start to melt!

After heating them up, take a pair of socks and put them on. Keep the shoes on for about 20 minutes, so the heat will help stretch out the rubber.

3) Heat Your Shoes in the Oven

If you want to take things up a notch, then you can try heating your shoes in the oven. This is definitely not recommended for beginners, as it takes a bit of practice and know-how to do it safely.

First, put on your new climbing shoes and tighten them as much as possible. Next, place them on a baking sheet in the oven at the lowest possible temperature. Make sure to keep an eye on them, so they don’t start melting!

After about 15 minutes, take them out and put them on. They should be nice and warm, which will help stretch out the rubber. Again, make sure not to overheat them, or you may end up with melted rubber on your hands!

4) Wear a Plastic Liner On Your Feet

Another way to speed up the stretching process is to wear a thin plastic liner on your feet while wearing your climbing shoes. This will help them stretch out more quickly and make them more comfortable to wear.

5) Use a Sock Liner

A sock liner is an easy way to break climbing shoes because it helps the shoe mold around your foot. If you’re using a sock liner, make sure you put them on before putting your feet into the shoes and then wear them for short periods at first (about 15-30 minutes) until they become more comfortable when worn without socks.

6) Climb with a Heavy Book

You can also try climbing with a heavy book wrapped around each foot and tied snugly in place by using an elastic band. This will help stretch climbing shoes more quickly without having to wear them often or buy expensive equipment like wedges and shims to use while training indoors!

Check this out: How To Soften The Back Of New Shoes (13 Easy Tips)

7) Wear Them In Hot Water Or a Hot Shower

When you first get your new climbing shoes, it’s important to wear them often so they can begin stretching out. If you only use your new pair of climbing shoes once every week, then it will likely take much longer to break them in.

Try wearing them every day or two, so they can stretch out more quickly. You should also try wearing them in hot water or a hot shower for 30 minutes at least once per week to help speed up the breaking-in process.

8) Use Wedges and Shims

If you’re having trouble breaking in your new shoes and they still feel too tight, you can try using wedges or shims. Wedges are made of a softer material, such as foam rubber, that helps stretch climbing shoes over time.

Shims are thin pieces of plastic or metal that help take up space inside the shoe, which also helps stretch it out. You can buy wedges and shims online or at your local climbing shop.

9) Freeze Them Overnight

If you’re having trouble breaking in your shoes and they still feel too tight, then you can try freezing them overnight. This will help the rubber stretch out more quickly. Just make sure not to leave them in the freezer for too long, or they may crack!

Synthetic climbing Shoes are notorious for being uncomfortable when first worn, but with a bit of patience and these simple, you can break them in quickly and easily. In this blog post, we will teach you how to break in your new climbing shoes so that you can start crushing climbs right away!

If you’re just starting out climbing, it’s important to have a good pair of climbing shoes. Climbing shoes are notorious for being uncomfortable when you first start wearing them, but with a few simple tricks, you can break them in quickly and easily! In this blog post, we will teach you how to break in your new climbing shoes so that you can start crushing climbs right away!

Conclusion:

There are a few different ways to break in your new climbing shoes quickly and easily. We have outlined a few of the most common methods in this blog post, so be sure to try them out! The most important thing is to be patient and wear them often – it may take a little time for your shoes to break in, but eventually, they will feel like a second skin.

Be sure to follow us on social media for more climbing tips, tricks, and advice! You can find all of our accounts in the footer.

Check this out: What Color Socks To Wear with Brown Shoes? (7 Easy Tips)

FAQs

How long does it take to break into new climbing shoes?

It typically takes 3-5 sessions to break into new climbing shoes. This process can be accelerated by wearing them around the house and doing light climbs, but ultimately it takes time for the shoes to form to your feet. In addition, keep in mind that breaking in new shoes may result in some discomfort as they mold to your feet, so be prepared for a bit of a learning curve.

How do you soften rock climbing shoes?

One method is to simply wear them around as much as possible. The more you wear them, the more they will be molded to your feet and the less uncomfortable they will be. If you’re not able to go rock climbing often, try taking walks in them or doing other activities that will help break them in.

Another way to soften your shoes is by using a shoe stretcher. This is a device that helps stretch out the shoes and make them larger so that they are more comfortable to wear.

Are new climbing shoes supposed to hurt?

No, new climbing shoes are not supposed to hurt. In fact, they should feel quite comfortable and snug, like a glove for your foot. If your new shoes are causing you pain, it’s likely that they’re either too small or too big. Make sure to double-check the size before you buy them!

Should your toes be curled in climbing shoes?

Yes, most climbers will tell you that you should curl your toes in climbing shoes. This is because it provides a tighter fit and more support for your foot while climbing. It also helps to keep the shoe from slipping off your foot.

Do climbing shoes shrink?

Yes, climbing shoes can shrink. If a climbing shoe is made of leather, it will likely stretch the first time it’s worn and then start to shrink as it dries out. If a climbing shoe is made of synthetic materials, it may not stretch as much when new, but it will still shrink over time. Climbing shoes should never be put in the dryer because this will cause them to shrink even more.


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Ashton Turner
By Ashton Turner

Ashton has been combining his love for fashion with his passion for writing for years. He enjoys tinkering with Shoes, scoping out the latest watches, and whiling away the hours at the computer - usually by writing about his findings.



Enhance Fashion is reader-supported. When you buy through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.

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